Re: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

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Re: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

Joshua Ferraro-3
On Tue, Feb 14, 2006 at 11:20:49PM -0600, Steven F. Baljkas wrote:
> Moreover, even if you still want to do so, Carol, Koha doesn't --
> that is, at present, it CAN'T -- make use of the required $6 linking
> subfield.*** I can't see how you would overcome that barrier without a
> heavy investment in programming.
Actually, Koha CAN make use of the $6 linking subfield in tag 880. It
requires no programming, just about a minute of time setting up the
framework. See here:
http://koha.liblime.com/cgi-bin/koha/acqui.simple/addbiblio.pl

(tab 4)

To set up 880 $6 in your Koha system do the following:

Go the the Koha administration page:

/cgi-bin/koha/admin-home.pl

Click on 'Biblio framework'
Click on 'MARC structure' for the 'default framework'
at the bottom of the page, click on 'Add New MARC Tag'
Type in the number (880), Label for intranet and OPAC (ALTERNATE GRAPHIC REPRESENTATION), click on 'Repeatable' since 880 is repeatable.
Click on 'Save Changes.

Now you've added tag 880 and you can add $6.

>From the list, click on 'view subfields' for tag 880
Click on 'Edit Subfields'
put '6' in the Subfield and change 'managed in tab' to '4'.
Click on Save Changes.

That's it, you're done!

BTW: Steven, this is another example of you framing something in terms
of what Koha is capable of doing, when in fact, it's merely a matter
of not RTFM.

Cheers,

--
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President, Technology       migration, training, maintenance, support
LibLime                                Featuring Koha Open-Source ILS
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Re: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

Carol Ku
Please refer to my comment in blue

Joshua Ferraro <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Tue, Feb 14, 2006 at 11:20:49PM -0600, Steven F. Baljkas wrote:
> Moreover, even if you still want to do so, Carol, Koha doesn't --
> that is, at present, it CAN'T -- make use of the required $6 linking
> subfield.*** I can't see how you would overcome that barrier without a
> heavy investment in programming.
Actually, Koha CAN make use of the $6 linking subfield in tag 880. It
requires no programming, just about a minute of time setting up the
framework. See here:
http://koha.liblime.com/cgi-bin/koha/acqui.simple/addbiblio.pl

(tab 4)

To set up 880 $6 in your Koha system do the following:

Go the the Koha administration page:

/cgi-bin/koha/admin-home.pl

Click on 'Biblio framework'
Click on 'MARC structure' for the 'default framework'
at the bottom of the page, click on 'Add New MARC Tag'
Type in the number (880), Label for intranet and OPAC (ALTERNATE GRAPHIC REPRESENTATION), click on 'Repeatable' since 880 is repeatable.
Click on 'Save Changes.

Now you've added tag 880 and you can add $6.

From the list, click on 'view subfields' for tag 880
Click on 'Edit Subfields'
put '6' in the Subfield and change 'managed in tab' to '4'.
Click on Save Changes.

That's it, you're done!
 
i think the $6 linking field is different from a regular subfield a, b or c etc.
In MARC, all the information on the book will be stored in the native language in tag 880.  Then they use $6 linking field to tie 880 to tag 100 for Name etc... so e.g. 880 $6100 a.... so this tag means information stored here is the author name (designated by code $6100) in e.g Chinese.  $6 is not a regular subfield....


BTW: Steven, this is another example of you framing something in terms
of what Koha is capable of doing, when in fact, it's merely a matter
of not RTFM.

Cheers,

--
Joshua Ferraro VENDOR SERVICES FOR OPEN-SOURCE SOFTWARE
President, Technology migration, training, maintenance, support
LibLime Featuring Koha Open-Source ILS
[hidden email] |Full Demos at http://liblime.com/koha |1(888)KohaILS


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Re: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

Joshua Ferraro-3
On Fri, Feb 24, 2006 at 12:26:29PM -0800, Carol Ku wrote:
> i think the $6 linking field is different from a regular
> subfield a, b or c
> etc.
>
> In MARC, all the information on the book will be stored in the native
> language in tag 880.  Then they use $6 linking field to tie 880 to tag 100
> for Name etc... so e.g. 880 $6100 a.... so this tag means information
> stored here is the author name (designated by code $6100) in e.g Chinese.
> $6 is not a regular subfield....
OK ... first let's discuss what you're trying to do. I have had two
years of Chinese language classes so I know that there are several
ways to represent Chinese. Are you attempting to put 'pinyin' in the
100a and then link to the actual characters in 880? What is your goal
in using the 880?

Cheers,

--
Joshua Ferraro               VENDOR SERVICES FOR OPEN-SOURCE SOFTWARE
President, Technology       migration, training, maintenance, support
LibLime                                Featuring Koha Open-Source ILS
[hidden email] |Full Demos at http://liblime.com/koha |1(888)KohaILS
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Re: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

Carol Ku
You are perfectly right.  I noticed that most libraries such as Library of Congress, they represent Chinese pinyin in tag 100, and this piece of info is linked to tag 880 $6100 and with other related subfields etc...
 
We would like to do the following:
 
1) save the pinyin and Chinese in Koha.
2) Display Chinese info in OPAC
3) Allow user to search using pinyin if they don't have Chinese input
 
Since Koha display only one line item for title, author etc, we are thinking may be we need to use MARCEdit to tweak tag 100 to 880 $6100.  I was advised by others that I should instead designate new tag e.g. 900 for tag 880 $6100, 901 for tag 880 $6245 etc.
 
To make things more complicated, MARCEdit does not seem to recognize the $6 link either.  So it will treat all tag 880 as one tag.
Joshua Ferraro <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Fri, Feb 24, 2006 at 12:26:29PM -0800, Carol Ku wrote:
> i think the $6 linking field is different from a regular
> subfield a, b or c
> etc.
>
> In MARC, all the information on the book will be stored in the native
> language in tag 880. Then they use $6 linking field to tie 880 to tag 100
> for Name etc... so e.g. 880 $6100 a.... so this tag means information
> stored here is the author name (designated by code $6100) in e.g Chinese.
> $6 is not a regular subfield....
OK ... first let's discuss what you're trying to do. I have had two
years of Chinese language classes so I know that there are several
ways to represent Chinese. Are you attempting to put 'pinyin' in the
100a and then link to the actual characters in 880? What is your goal
in using the 880?

Cheers,

--
Joshua Ferraro VENDOR SERVICES FOR OPEN-SOURCE SOFTWARE
President, Technology migration, training, maintenance, support
LibLime Featuring Koha Open-Source ILS
[hidden email] |Full Demos at http://liblime.com/koha |1(888)KohaILS

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RE: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

Bigwood, David
In reply to this post by Joshua Ferraro-3

I can’t comment on your problem, but maybe this will help somewhere in your project.

 

 

MARC::Detrans - De-transliterate text and MARC records
MARC::Detrans is an eclectic addition to the already eclectic MARC::Record distribution for de-transliterating MARC::Records. What is detransliteration you ask? Well it's the opposite of transliteration, which according to the Merriam-Webster: to represent or spell in the characters of another alphabet. Traditionally when librarians catalog an item that has a title in a non-Roman script they will follow transliteration rules for converting the title into the Roman alphabet, so that the bibliographic record could be filed into the card catalog or database index appropriately. These Romanization Rules are published by the Library of Congress http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/roman.html.

 

http://search.cpan.org/~esummers/MARC-Detrans-1.2/lib/MARC/Detrans.pm

 

Sincerely,

David Bigwood

[hidden email]

Lunar and Planetary Institute

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/library/whats_new.shtml

Catalogablog

http://catalogablog.blogspot.com

 

 


From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Carol Ku
Sent: Friday, February 24, 2006 3:42 PM
To: Joshua Ferraro
Cc: Koha Mailing List; Koha Windows
Subject: Re: [Koha-win32] Re: [Koha] Tag 880

 

You are perfectly right.  I noticed that most libraries such as Library of Congress, they represent Chinese pinyin in tag 100, and this piece of info is linked to tag 880 $6100 and with other related subfields etc...

 

We would like to do the following:

 

1) save the pinyin and Chinese in Koha.

2) Display Chinese info in OPAC

3) Allow user to search using pinyin if they don't have Chinese input

 

Since Koha display only one line item for title, author etc, we are thinking may be we need to use MARCEdit to tweak tag 100 to 880 $6100.  I was advised by others that I should instead designate new tag e.g. 900 for tag 880 $6100, 901 for tag 880 $6245 etc.

 

To make things more complicated, MARCEdit does not seem to recognize the $6 link either.  So it will treat all tag 880 as one tag.
Joshua Ferraro <[hidden email]> wrote:

On Fri, Feb 24, 2006 at 12:26:29PM -0800, Carol Ku wrote:
> i think the $6 linking field is different from a regular
> subfield a, b or c
> etc.
>
> In MARC, all the information on the book will be stored in the native
> language in tag 880. Then they use $6 linking field to tie 880 to tag 100
> for Name etc... so e.g. 880 $6100 a.... so this tag means information
> stored here is the author name (designated by code $6100) in e.g Chinese.
> $6 is not a regular subfield....
OK ... first let's discuss what you're trying to do. I have had two
years of Chinese language classes so I know that there are several
ways to represent Chinese. Are you attempting to put 'pinyin' in the
100a and then link to the actual characters in 880? What is your goal
in using the 880?

Cheers,

--
Joshua Ferraro VENDOR SERVICES FOR OPEN-SOURCE SOFTWARE
President, Technology migration, training, maintenance, support
LibLime Featuring Koha Open-Source ILS
[hidden email] |Full Demos at http://liblime.com/koha |1(888)KohaILS

 

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Re: Re: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

Steven F.Baljkas
In reply to this post by Joshua Ferraro-3
Friday, February 24, 2006    19:21 CST

Hi, Carol, Joshua, et al.,

Just catching up with the e-mail a little late today.

Carol had posed a question a while back on getting actual Chinese characters both in MARC records and out in the Koha OPAC display.

I had suggested MARCEdit might be able to help with some things in the past, but if memory serves -- I'm not 100% on this and you would have to check the MARC standards online or in print to confirm this but--, the $6 linking fields have to be generated by the ILS itself to provide such linkages. Most of the ILS I have experienced simply cannot do this. (I assume that Voyager and Aleph can because they are known for multiscript abilities.) I don't think Koha can (not that that is a bad thing for this stage in its development, considering the complexity and rarity of the need for $6 linkages).

The purpose of the 880, Joshua, according to my erstwhile go-to guy on the history and evolution of MARC coding, was to hold non-Roman script characters.

I gather that, although computers may have been able to code for them for a long while now (since the 1960s? via hexadecimal and ASCII and Lord knows probably other codes), there weren't any ILS at the beginning that could make use of them. Hence, 880 and associated fields were contrived so that data could be preserved against loss (recall our discussion of backing things up: I tell you, we cataloguers are THE pre-eminent packrats of humanity - no iota to be lost! ;-D).

If I recall my original advice to you, Carol, it was to ***try to see if Koha could display the original Chinese script correctly in the 100 and 245 fields*** (and for that matter, the other core descriptive fields, although I know I didn't say that before).

I know that there have been questions -- some of them intiated by you, IIRC -- on UTF8 etc. that are relevant to this. I just don't know what Koha's status is on using non-Roman scripts. Sorry. It would be really good to know how that works though. From what I am used to seeing in other ILS, it usually requires that the cataloguers enter special codes -- either hexadecimal or system proprietary ones -- in order to ensure that special characters will display properly for patrons (usually, the cataloguers end up having to look at codes or messy weird stuff in place of real letters or logograms).

Continuing the re-iteration of my original advice to you, Carol: if you are able to put the actual Chinese characters into the 100 and 245, you could use a 700$a or 900$a to provide access to the author entry transcribed, and perhaps a 242 (technically TRANSLATION of title, which is never a bad thing), 246, 700$t, 730 and/or 740 fields to provide transcribed title access.

Although anyone who knows me knows I actually like the cataloguing rules, what I am proposing (other than the 900$a which is free to do with as you please) bends if not breaks the cataloguing rules. However, it should work, given that Joshua has assured us that Koha can access 700 fields (at least from 2.2.5 on) and 246s.

A quick word about transcriptions, because I know this topic has caused headaches for Chinese-language cataloguers.

In 2000, LC prescribed that the Pinyin system of romanization was to supersede the previously used Wade-Giles system.

Carol, ***if you are retrieving older MARC21 (really USMARC, etc.) records, you may very well have to move the transcribed fields and create the now REQUIRED pinyin transcriptions.***

(There is not, so far as I know, a requirement to DELETE the older Wade-Giles transcriptions, but someone working directly in the field may well correct me on that point .)

Now, Carol, please also note: you can take all this with a grain of salt (ignore it) if you don't care about having your library comply with the ALA-LC practices mandated in this case. I have seen libraries request and rely on their own transliteration systems for Russian and Ukrainian so I know that ALA-LC practices are not always heeded when it comes to dealing with non-Roman script cataloguing matters.

I hope that this re-iteration and amplification will help somewhat. I am very interested to learn how this resolves for you and I do hope it will work out well.

Best wishes with this tricky problem!

Cheers,
Steven F. Baljkas
library tech at large
Koha neophyte
Winnipeg, MB, Canada

============================================================
From: Carol Ku <[hidden email]>
Date: 2006/02/24 Fri PM 03:41:35 CST
To: Joshua Ferraro <[hidden email]>
CC: Koha Mailing List <[hidden email]>,
        Koha Windows <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Koha-win32] Re: [Koha] Tag 880

You are perfectly right.  I noticed that most libraries such as Library of Congress, they represent Chinese pinyin in tag 100, and this piece of info is linked to tag 880 $6100 and with other related subfields etc...
   
  We would like to do the following:
   
  1) save the pinyin and Chinese in Koha.
  2) Display Chinese info in OPAC
  3) Allow user to search using pinyin if they don't have Chinese input
   
  Since Koha display only one line item for title, author etc, we are thinking may be we need to use MARCEdit to tweak tag 100 to 880 $6100.  I was advised by others that I should instead designate new tag e.g. 900 for tag 880 $6100, 901 for tag 880 $6245 etc.
   
  To make things more complicated, MARCEdit does not seem to recognize the $6 link either.  So it will treat all tag 880 as one tag.
Joshua Ferraro <[hidden email]> wrote:
  On Fri, Feb 24, 2006 at 12:26:29PM -0800, Carol Ku wrote:
> i think the $6 linking field is different from a regular
> subfield a, b or c
> etc.
>
> In MARC, all the information on the book will be stored in the native
> language in tag 880. Then they use $6 linking field to tie 880 to tag 100
> for Name etc... so e.g. 880 $6100 a.... so this tag means information
> stored here is the author name (designated by code $6100) in e.g Chinese.
> $6 is not a regular subfield....
OK ... first let's discuss what you're trying to do. I have had two
years of Chinese language classes so I know that there are several
ways to represent Chinese. Are you attempting to put 'pinyin' in the
100a and then link to the actual characters in 880? What is your goal
in using the 880?

Cheers,

--
Joshua Ferraro VENDOR SERVICES FOR OPEN-SOURCE SOFTWARE
President, Technology migration, training, maintenance, support
LibLime Featuring Koha Open-Source ILS
[hidden email] |Full Demos at http://liblime.com/koha |1(888)KohaILS

_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
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Re: Re: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

Joshua Ferraro-3
OK ... sorry it's taken so long for a response on this, I'm currently
involved in a migration for a client....here goes:

First off, thanks for asking this question, in the process of answering it
I discovered and fixed two bugs in the Koha MARC editor (so before you
try this I'd suggest updating Biblio.pm and addbiblio.pl to the latest
CVS versions, ask me for details if you need to).

So, using the Koha MARC editor, I did a bit of original MARC cataloging
for a Chinese language book. koha.liblime.com, like Carol's Koha, runs
on UTF-8, so it can easily store and display any UTF-8 Characters. Here
is the record:

http://opac.liblime.com/cgi-bin/koha/opac-MARCdetail.pl?bib=23717

You'll notice that I used the 880 Linkage fields to add the pinyin
as specified in the MARC standard. The interesting bit is that although
Koha does not yet understand how to treat the 880 $6 (which as far as
I can tell is a true exception to the rule), a keyword search for the
pinyin does in fact bring up the record. (author and title won't work
however). So that's good, not great, but good.

Notice that there are also Linkage entries in the 100 and 245 tags: it
goes both ways. I understand how this could be used by the system to
not only link the two for searching, but also to generate the proper
rules of the associated 880 tag. Of course, understanding how it SHOULD
work, doesn't mean it does yet ... but keep reading, it gets better,
I promise.

As I understand it, one of the ways 880 can be used is for transliteration,
that is, storing different ways to represent the same language. Now, here's
the problem with 880 in MARC: it's far too limited for what I'd like you
to be able to do. First, it doesn't allow any fine distinctions for different
'scripts'. You can, in fact, specify the kind of script you're linking
but you only have the following choices:

(3 Arabic
(B Latin
$1 Chinese, Japanese, Korean
(N Cyrillic
(2 Hebrew

However, at least in Standard Mandarin, which I studied, there are no
less than five ways to represent the language: traditional hanzi, simple
hanzi, pinyin, Yale and Wade-Giles (well, there's also Zhuyinfuhao, but I
assume you are not tailoring to youngsters). MARC is sadly lacking in that
you can only provide a one-to-one mapping and thus only include two
representation variations.

But let's not stop there. In addition to there being lots of different
ways to represent the Chinese language, there are also many ways to
_encode_ _each_ representation. UTF-8 and Big-5 are two that come to
mind. I suspect this is where most of the problem comes from in the
first place: your students being at keyboards without the ability to
encode in the proper way to search the traditional catalog.

Here comes Koha to the rescue, and here's what I would suggest you start
doing. First, have a look at what it looks like:

http://opac.liblime.com/cgi-bin/koha/opac-MARCdetail.pl?bib=23719

What you are looking at is a record for a Chinese language book that
I cataloged using Koha's MARC editor after making several minor
adjustments to the Koha MARC Framework. Without breaking any MARC
rules, using local use fields, and using Koha's 'search also'
feature, you can find that record using a keyword, author, or
title search using ANY of UTF-8, Big5, pinyin, Yale, or Wade-Giles.
But don't stop there, you can add as many transliterations as you
like, there is literally no limit. Oh ... and feel free to leave
those 880s in there, some day Koha will be able to handle them
as well.

Eat your heart out Voyager :-).

--
Joshua Ferraro               VENDOR SERVICES FOR OPEN-SOURCE SOFTWARE
President, Technology       migration, training, maintenance, support
LibLime                                Featuring Koha Open-Source ILS
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Re: Re: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

BWS Johnson
In reply to this post by Joshua Ferraro-3
Salvete!

>Eat your heart out Voyager :-).

:) This is hot! Support for Koha is totally better than commercial products.

From what I gather, this seems like it will be around post MARC, too.

Brooke @ Hinsdale MA
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Re: Re: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

Carol Ku
In reply to this post by Joshua Ferraro-3
Joshua:
You are wonderful!!!  You mention you used the Koha MARC edit in catalogue, that means you manually enter the Chinese books in koha catalogue, and not download the record from some libraries?
 
Pardon me if this question appears to be silly.  But your input is very helpful still.
 
Carol

Joshua Ferraro <[hidden email]> wrote:
OK ... sorry it's taken so long for a response on this, I'm currently
involved in a migration for a client....here goes:

First off, thanks for asking this question, in the process of answering it
I discovered and fixed two bugs in the Koha MARC editor (so before you
try this I'd suggest updating Biblio.pm and addbiblio.pl to the latest
CVS versions, ask me for details if you need to).

So, using the Koha MARC editor, I did a bit of original MARC cataloging
for a Chinese language book. koha.liblime.com, like Carol's Koha, runs
on UTF-8, so it can easily store and display any UTF-8 Characters. Here
is the record:

http://opac.liblime.com/cgi-bin/koha/opac-MARCdetail.pl?bib=23717

You'll notice that I used the 880 Linkage fields to add the pinyin
as specified in the MARC standard. The interesting bit is that although
Koha does not yet understand how to treat the 880 $6 (which as far as
I can tell is a true exception to the rule), a keyword search for the
pinyin does in fact bring up the record. (author and title won't work
however). So that's good, not great, but good.

Notice that there are also Linkage entries in the 100 and 245 tags: it
goes both ways. I understand how this could be used by the system to
not only link the two for searching, but also to generate the proper
rules of the associated 880 tag. Of course, understanding how it SHOULD
work, doesn't mean it does yet ... but keep reading, it gets better,
I promise.

As I understand it, one of the ways 880 can be used is for transliteration,
that is, storing different ways to represent the same language. Now, here's
the problem with 880 in MARC: it's far too limited for what I'd like you
to be able to do. First, it doesn't allow any fine distinctions for different
'scripts'. You can, in fact, specify the kind of script you're linking
but you only have the following choices:

(3 Arabic
(B Latin
$1 Chinese, Japanese, Korean
(N Cyrillic
(2 Hebrew

However, at least in Standard Mandarin, which I studied, there are no
less than five ways to represent the language: traditional hanzi, simple
hanzi, pinyin, Yale and Wade-Giles (well, there's also Zhuyinfuhao, but I
assume you are not tailoring to youngsters). MARC is sadly lacking in that
you can only provide a one-to-one mapping and thus only include two
representation variations.

But let's not stop there. In addition to there being lots of different
ways to represent the Chinese language, there are also many ways to
_encode_ _each_ representation. UTF-8 and Big-5 are two that come to
mind. I suspect this is where most of the problem comes from in the
first place: your students being at keyboards without the ability to
encode in the proper way to search the traditional catalog.

Here comes Koha to the rescue, and here's what I would suggest you start
doing. First, have a look at what it looks like:

http://opac.liblime.com/cgi-bin/koha/opac-MARCdetail.pl?bib=23719

What you are looking at is a record for a Chinese language book that
I cataloged using Koha's MARC editor after making several minor
adjustments to the Koha MARC Framework. Without breaking any MARC
rules, using local use fields, and using Koha's 'search also'
feature, you can find that record using a keyword, author, or
title search using ANY of UTF-8, Big5, pinyin, Yale, or Wade-Giles.
But don't stop there, you can add as many transliterations as you
like, there is literally no limit. Oh ... and feel free to leave
those 880s in there, some day Koha will be able to handle them
as well.

Eat your heart out Voyager :-).

--
Joshua Ferraro VENDOR SERVICES FOR OPEN-SOURCE SOFTWARE
President, Technology migration, training, maintenance, support
LibLime Featuring Koha Open-Source ILS
[hidden email] |Full Demos at http://liblime.com/koha |1(888)KohaILS


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Re: Re: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

Joshua Ferraro-3
On Sat, Feb 25, 2006 at 09:39:43AM -0800, Carol Ku wrote:
> Joshua:
> You are wonderful!!!  You mention you used the Koha MARC edit in catalogue,
> that means you manually enter the Chinese books in koha catalogue, and not
> download the record from some libraries?
Yep, that's right. So long as you have UTF-8 set up correctly, you can input
as well as display any utf-8 you want in Koha.

Now, let me warn you that the Koha MARC editor is still not perfect
and I would still recommend you use an external MARC editor if that
has been your cataloging practice thusfar. You should be able to set
it up to handle a repeatable 900, 945, etc. tag, with the appropriate
subfields to handle the transcriptions (don't limit yourself to just
the title/author, feel free to include any others you want). So long
as you set up your MARC Framework to handle the 9XX fields and link
to them via the search points (ie 245a will need a 'search also'
entry for '945a','945c' (and you might as well put '245c' in there
while you're at it)), it will work without having to use Koha's
editor. If you need more specific implementation details let me
know.

> Pardon me if this question appears to be silly.  But your input is
> very helpful still.
No question is silly :-). I'm glad I could be of some help.

Sincerely,

--
Joshua Ferraro               VENDOR SERVICES FOR OPEN-SOURCE SOFTWARE
President, Technology       migration, training, maintenance, support
LibLime                                Featuring Koha Open-Source ILS
[hidden email] |Full Demos at http://liblime.com/koha |1(888)KohaILS
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Re: Re: [Koha-win32] Re: Tag 880

Carol Ku
So if we were to download books directly from other libraries... it may involve lots of record code editing, as all the Chinese info in other libraries will be entered into tag 880. 
 
e.g.  100  Author name in pinyin
        245  Author name in pinyin
        880 $6100  Author name in chinese
        880 $6245  Title name in Chinese
 
With the MARC record downloaded, I wonder if I can swap the information in tag 880 $6100 with that of tag 100, so that when I upload the record into Koha, OPAC will display the author name in Chinese instead of pinyin.
 
 I suspect MARCEdit will not be able to recognize the $6 link.  So I cannot designate the info at tag 100 to be swapped with info at tag 880$100 and not say 880$245.
 
Anyway, Joshua, you have been of a great help.  Thank you.
 
Carol
Joshua Ferraro <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Sat, Feb 25, 2006 at 09:39:43AM -0800, Carol Ku wrote:
> Joshua:
> You are wonderful!!! You mention you used the Koha MARC edit in catalogue,
> that means you manually enter the Chinese books in koha catalogue, and not
> download the record from some libraries?
Yep, that's right. So long as you have UTF-8 set up correctly, you can input
as well as display any utf-8 you want in Koha.

Now, let me warn you that the Koha MARC editor is still not perfect
and I would still recommend you use an external MARC editor if that
has been your cataloging practice thusfar. You should be able to set
it up to handle a repeatable 900, 945, etc. tag, with the appropriate
subfields to handle the transcriptions (don't limit yourself to just
the title/author, feel free to include any others you want). So long
as you set up your MARC Framework to handle the 9XX fields and link
to them via the search points (ie 245a will need a 'search also'
entry for '945a','945c' (and you might as well put '245c' in there
while you're at it)), it will work without having to use Koha's
editor. If you need more specific implementation details let me
know.

> Pardon me if this question appears to be silly. But your input is
> very helpful still.
No question is silly :-). I'm glad I could be of some help.

Sincerely,

--
Joshua Ferraro VENDOR SERVICES FOR OPEN-SOURCE SOFTWARE
President, Technology migration, training, maintenance, support
LibLime Featuring Koha Open-Source ILS
[hidden email] |Full Demos at http://liblime.com/koha |1(888)KohaILS


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